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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

3 edition of Inconsistent regulation of wetlands and other waters found in the catalog.

Inconsistent regulation of wetlands and other waters

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment

Inconsistent regulation of wetlands and other waters

hearing before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, second session, March 30, 2004

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment

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  • 7 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States. -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers,
  • Wetland management -- United States -- Evaluation,
  • Water quality management -- United States

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 200 p. :
    Number of Pages200
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15568444M
    ISBN 100160744075
    OCLC/WorldCa58649826

      The question of which streams, lakes, wetlands and other water bodies across the U.S. should receive federal protection under the Clean Water Act has been a major controversy in environmental law. Wetland functions and values depend upon not only the size, shape, type, and other characteristics of a wetland but upon proximity and connections with other waters, water quality, adjacent upland buffers, threats, and a broad range of other factors. Creation or restoration of wetland characteristics alone will not insure replication of.

      Wetlands, the in-between zone separating water and land, serve a crucial role in soaking up flood waters, filtering pollution and providing habitat to fish and wildlife. pertaining to wetland, floodplain and riparian area functions and values and a selected bibliography and list of web sites. The guidebook draws on lessons learned from a broad range of wetland, floodplain, water resources development, watershed management, river, water quality and other community efforts over the past 20 years.

    We protect and manage wetlands through multiple state laws, which define our regulatory authority. Two state laws, the state Water Pollution Control Act and the Shoreline Management Act, give us the authority to regulate also use the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) process to identify potential wetland-related concerns early in the permitting process.   With all the complaints about federal regulation-- there is no clear-cut process to identify wetlands, enforcement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is inconsistent and arbitrary, interagency politics complicate regulation, EPA has turned its authority over to the corps, and both the EPA and the corps fail to recognize the expertise of state.


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Inconsistent regulation of wetlands and other waters by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book does a great job of providing the novice with adequate background information regarding the Clean Water Act and State laws concerning regulation of wetlands, and can assist the intermediate or expert wetlands specialist in everything from conducting wetlands delineation, to assessing wetlands function and values, to conducting effective wetlands mitigation planning.5/5(1).

Inconsistent regulation of wetlands and other waters: hearing before the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, second session, Ma (Book, ) [] Get this from a library.

Aware both that wetlands research is on the rise and that researchers and students are often working or learning across several disciplines, The Wetland Book is a readily accessible online and print reference which will be the first port of call on key concepts in wetlands science and management.

Discover librarian-selected research resources on Wetlands from the Questia online library, including full-text online books, academic journals, magazines, newspapers and more.

Home» Browse» Science and Technology» Environmental and Earth Sciences» Wetlands. WETLANDS REGULATION GUIDEBOOK FEDERAL CLEAN WATER ACT, SECTION Waters of the United States means: waters which are currently used, or were used in the past, or may be susceptible to use in interstate or foreign commerce, including all waters which are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide; 2.

all interstate waters including. 6) Adjacent Wetlands: Wetlands that physically touch other jurisdictional waters in a typical year. Under this definition, fewer wetlands are regulated than under the rule and pre rule because wetlands behind a berm or dike are no longer considered adjacent.

long-settled issues of wetland jurisdiction. Clean Water Act Jurisdictional Wetlands Wetlands or other waters that are subject to federal control are referred to as “jurisdictional waters” because they are within the regulatory jurisdiction of federal law.

The Clean Water Act (CWA)1 regulations. Interstate waters and wetlands 3. Intrastate waters where destruction or degradation could affecting interstate or foreign commerce (HQ approval required) Waters used for recreation or other purposes Waters with fish or shellfish sold in interstate or foreign commerce Waters used for industrial purposes.

Impoundments of waters of the U.S. More information on the elements of wetlands regulations. You may need a PDF reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more. Wetlands Regulations. Engineers’ (COE) Clean Water Act jurisdiction for the sites.

If you intend to conduct any activity that constitutes a discharge of dredged or fill material into wetlands or other waters, such as lakes, streams or ponds, you should request a jurisdictional determination from the Rock Island office of the COE prior to starting the work.

America's Wetlands. Wetlands are areas where water covers soil all or part of the time. Wetlands are important because they protect and improve water quality, provide fish and wildlife habitats, store floodwaters and maintain surface water flow during dry periods.

The regulatory process is often initiated at the local level (city, county, watershed district, watershed management organization or soil and water conservation district) where program representatives can identify which regulations apply depending on the location and nature of the proposed activity that may effect wetlands or other water resources.

Forty-two chapters by international experts from a wide range of disciplines make The Wetlands Handbook the essential tool for those seeking comprehensive understanding of the subject. A departure from more traditional treatises, this text examines freshwater wetland ecosystem science from the fundamentals to issues of management and policy.

The Navigable Waters Protection Rule (NWPR) ([ 1 ][1]), which was published in April by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of the Army (“the Agencies”), has redefined “waters of the U.S.” (WOTUS) to restrict federal protection of vulnerable waters ([ 2 ][2]).

With its emphasis on “continuous surface connections” and “permanen[ce],” the NWPR. For more information on wetland types, and wetland gains and losses visit the U.S.

Fish & Wildlife Service’s Wetland Status and Trends reports. Legal Protections of Wetlands: The first legal protection of wetlands came from President Jimmy Carter in He signed Executive Order into law requiring Federal government agencies to take steps to avoid impacts to wetland when possible.

The civil law rule: Paying for any harm you cause. In its simplest form, the civil law rule says that landowners are strictly liable for altering the natural drainage of surface water.

The rule thus is the exact opposite of the common enemy rule. Landowners have no right to alter drainage, and they have the right not to be injured by others altering the drainage.

contiguous to a traditionally navigable water, interstate water, territorial sea, impoundment or tributaries. Previously limited to adjacent wetlands, now any adjacent water Includes waters separated from jurisdictional waters by constructed dikes or barriers, natural river berms, beach dunes and other.

other landowners to graze and water livestock, make reasonable use of water resources, harvest natural products of the wetlands, selectively cut timber and otherwise engage in the use of land for agricultural production. ' Definitions. "Freshwater wetlands" means lands and waters of the state as shown on the freshwater.

The single most important book on wetlands, newly expanded and updated Wetlands is the definitive guide to this fragile ecosystem, providing the most comprehensive coverage and in-depth information available in print. Recently updated and expanded, this latest edition contains brand new information on Wetland Ecosystem Services and an updated discussion on Wetland, Carbon, and Climate Change.

water supplies by serving to purify surface water and groundwater resources; that freshwater wetlands provide a natural means of flood and storm damage protection, and thereby prevent the loss of life and property through the absorption and storage of water during high runoff periods.

Projects that could affect waters and wetlands must follow a specific process and comply with various state and federal regulations.

The most effective form of regulatory compliance is to identify and avoid water and wetland impacts from the earliest stages of a project. Impacting wetlands triggers permitting and mitigation requirements.Only a minority of all wetlands in the United States have permanent surface water (Shaw and Fredine ), so sampling techniques developed for other surface waters are not always applicable.

The extreme spatial and temporal variability often requires that large numbers of samples be collected if the wetland community is to be properly.The scientific study of wetlands rarely requires that the boundaries of wetlands be specifically defined.

In contrast, both the regulators of wetlands and the regulated community must be able to establish, by application of scientific principles, the limits of individual wetlands that are subject to legal requirements administered through a regulatory system.